Marylebone H/O 1936-               part 2

STEELWORK

This building is built of fireproof materials throughout, and is constructed with a complete Steel frame so that the whole load of floors and walls is carried direct by steel beams and columns to the foundations. None of, the walls are carrying anything but their own weight, as by this means any portion of the walls and floors can be removed or modified without detriment to the structure. The steel used is the best quality of British Manufacture, and its fabrication into the various members for the structure was done by British Labour. The floors are of reinforced concrete and hollow tile construction being thus fireproof and affording the maximum of strength with a minimum of weight.

The upper floors of the building are devoted to the assembly of Cash Registers and Accounting Machines, and are heavily constructed to bear the weight of printing presses, guillotine, drop hammers and other heavy plant. There are also spaces on these floors for storage of materials and finished products, which are all of a heavy nature.

This building is built of fireproof materials throughout, and is constructed with a complete Steel frame so that the whole load of floors and walls is carried direct by steel beams and columns to the foundations. None of the walls are carrying anything but their own weight, as by this means any portion of the walls and floors can be removed or modified without detriment to the structure. The steel used is the best quality of British Manufacture, and its fabrication into the various members for the structure was done by British Labour. The floors are of reinforced concrete and hollow tile construction being thus fireproof and affording the maximum of strength with a minimum of weight.

The upper floors of the building are devoted to the assembly of Cash Registers and Accounting Machines, and are heavily constructed to bear the weight of printing presses, guillotine, drop hammers and other heavy plant. There are also spaces on these floors for storage of materials and finished products, which are all of a heavy nature.

The number of internal columns has been reduced to a minimum in order to facilitate the allocation of departments, and 40 feet span girders were adopted to give a spacious unobstructed area for the main showroom on the ground floor. These girders' weigh 7 tons each.

Provision has also been made in the structure for the possibility of extension of the premises by making allowance for additional load on the columns on the northern side where the present garage and loading dock is situated.

The SITE

An interesting problem arose through leaving this space for development, as temporary support had to be given to the adjoining buildings until the contemplated extension butted against them and took the place of the' previous buildings which had been demolished. This was achieved by reinforced concrete buttresses with beams between them, at each floor, so, that the whole exposed surface of the wall was adequately stiffened.

As the loads imposed by this building and its usage were exceptionally heavy, it was not possible to found the building on the very fine sand which overlays the site. The foundations had therefore to be sunk~20 feet through the sand to, obtain an adequate bearing area on the London Blue Clay. Concrete piers were constructed from this level up to the requisite' level to receive reinforced concrete pads on which the steel slab bases of the columns were laid at basement level. The largest of these piers are 13 feet square and the steel slab bases 52 inches square by 6 inches thick.

The foundations against the adjoining buildings had also to be carried to this depth, and it was therefore necessary to under pin the adjoining buildings to the same level so that they were not imperilled by the necessarily deep excavations in their vicinity. This entailed very careful and painstaking work as not more than three feet lengths of such walls can be undermined at each operation.

As there is a basement floor, the roads and footways surrounding the site had to be adequately supported by reinforced concrete retaining walls which were constructed in waterproof cement to render the basement damp-proof.

1000 Tons of structural steel was used and 110,000 square feet of fireproof floors.

Marylebone H/O part 3